Tag Archives: Stowe Family Law LLP

Stowe Family Law: being a trainee solicitor

This post will serve as both my first post on the Stowe Family Law trainee blog, as well as a marker that I am around half way through my training contract. Throughout my time at law school, or even since leaving law school and spending time with non-lawyer friends, stereotypes often emerge surrounding the work that I do.

As such, I intend to use this blog post to dispel three myths that those not-in-the-know believe to be true.

Myth 1: Trainee solicitors are photocopying experts

Throughout law school, I heard horror stories of trainees spending hundreds of hours in copy rooms. I have often heard of training contracts at some firms being nothing more than lessons on the functionality of those large, copy-scan-printers. After a year of working in the London office, I can attest to being able to do some wizardry with a photocopier. Double siding. Focussing images. Enlarging. Reducing. Paginating in Roman numerals (a personal favourite). However I also spend a great deal of time wading through distinct tasks in a Partner’s case-load, waist deep in complicated law; learning.

Stowe encourages self-starters, who have a desire to practice and learn the law. I have been fortunate enough to attend conferences with very experienced barristers every week, and learnt areas of family law that are not run of the mill. I have been given work by very experienced solicitors on areas of law that they were unfamiliar with, and while under their diligent watch, made applications that I would not have made in larger city law firms. In a nutshell, my workload is both wide-ranging and complex. However, I can still photocopy with the best of them.

Myth 2: It’s all about the money

One thing that I have particularly benefitted from at Stowe, which is very different from other practices in London, is that I am encouraged to learn. If a solicitor in the London office is doing something that they haven’t done before – something that they find difficult or unusual – I am often asked if I would like to help or keep an eye on what they are doing. In this regard, a large part of my day is spent doing non-chargeable work. Learning.

I am not, as many of my non-lawyer friends would have me believe, bleeding clients dry. That is not how the legal profession works. It is certainly not how Stowe Family Law works.

As a firm which focuses on the trainee experience and encourages young lawyers to become very good at their job, it’s not all about the money. Stowe understands that sometimes it’s a nurturing hand that makes a trainee become a great lawyer in the future. It’s about reaping what they sow.

Myth 3: Lawyers are soulless

This is one of my favourite myths. Most people think that when we clock off, leave the office and head home, we switch off. That may be the case in some areas of law, however it certainly isn’t the case within family practice. Since starting as a paralegal at Stowe back in May 2014, I spend most of my waking hours thinking about other peoples’ issues. How a situation can be ameliorated for X. How we can ensure that Y has a good family Christmas. Family lawyers do not switch off.

For more information on trainee contracts see this post: Time to Review Stowe Family Law training contracts.

I hope that this post has proven useful in some small way. Be it for a law student thinking of a career within family law or for one of our clients to glean a small insight into what the firm’s trainees actually get up to. I hope to help lift the veil a little more in future blog posts.

Stowe Family Law Harrogate and litigants in person

Stowe Family Law Harrogate and Litigants in Person

By Shanika Varga of Stowe Family Law Harrogate.

Litigants in person- the unrecognised victims

Since the introduction of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO) legal aid has been restricted to only covering family law cases which involve domestic violence which can be proven, most other private matters are now out of scope. This has resulted in a significant increase in litigants in person in divorce and financial proceedings and proceedings relating to children.  The National Audit Office (NAO) has reported a 22% increase in cases involving contact with children and a 30% increase across all family court cases in which neither party had legal representation.

A litigant in person is someone who conducts legal proceedings on their own behalf without a legal professional. It is very often the case that a LIP will have sought legal advice at some stage during the proceedings, whether it be that they instructed someone to start off with but simply couldn’t afford the legal fees, that they started proceedings as a LIP but then sought legal representation further down the line or that they receive ad-hoc advice out of court but self-represent during hearings.

Litigants in person have been referred to as the ‘victims’ of the legal aid cuts but from my personal experience it is all the parties that are involved in a case where one person is unrepresented that become victims of the cuts to Legal Aid.

In the past 12 months I have been involved in several matters where one party was self-representing. The issues that were brought to my attention were numerous. One of the concerns expressed prior to LAPSO coming into force was that the inevitable increase in LIP may clog up the courts. Research conducted by the NAO showed that hearings involving LIP’s take around 50% longer on average.   During a recent Children Act hearing, the unrepresented parties’ failure to adhere to orders that had been made resulted in the Final Hearing being adjourned due to evidence not being available. This meant the matter was relisted for the earliest possible date, this was 4 months later! Not only that but the District Judge decided that because one party didn’t have legal representation, the time estimate for this hearing should be increased from one day to two days. It was quite evident, that this was necessary, the unsuccessful hearing was exhausting. The unrepresented party continued to interrupt both the District Judge and our client’s barrister, hadn’t brought any of the documents they were previously ordered to and had even failed to bring the court bundle that was sent to them by ourselves only days before, which included a very clear letter stating these documents must be brought to Court. Although the District Judge remained patient and gave the LIP the required leeway, the frustration was clear. What could have been an effective hearing had the LIP had legal representation was now a full wasted day…

The victims? The LIP, our client and most importantly the children! The LIP likely left that hearing more confused than when they entered. Our client now had to pay for an ineffective hearing and had the added cost of attending a further, now two day hearing! Not only this but the Family Procedure Rules dictate that the onus is on the represented party to prepare court bundles and documents, even if they aren’t the party that made the application as is the usual practice, thus resulting in more costs! But more disappointingly, the children were no closer to what could only be described as acrimonious and difficult proceedings coming to an end. Although it is practice to ensure that children do not become involved in proceedings in order to protect their emotional welfare, it is extremely difficult to keep them completely shielded. Children are perceptive and pick up on their parents emotions and actions, even with no mention of court hearings or proceedings a child is likely to be aware of mood changes or strained interactions, no matter how well a parent thinks they are concealing these feelings. The longer the proceedings continue, the longer the children are left with uncertainty and the longer they are exposed to the inevitable stress and upset their parents are feeling as was the case in this situation.

Late last year I attended another Children Act Final Hearing. The matter had been ongoing for a year. As is often the case, our client didn’t feel as though they could deal with the proceedings without legal representation and with something as precious as their child’s future didn’t feel it would be right to go ahead without assistance, who could blame them? Much to our client’s relief the matter settled on the morning of the Final Hearing, but unfortunately there was a feeling of disappointment that matters had gone this far. The unrepresented party commented that an agreement could be reached sooner had they been received certain advice, or in other words had they had a solicitor. I would go one step further and question had they been able to access a solicitor via legal aid, would they have even issued the application? It may well be that they would have done so anyway, but it is fair to say that had they obtained legal advice, it is highly unlikely that they would have issued the application on the basis they did, the unrepresented party sought a division of time which the court’s were very unlikely to order and any good solicitor would have advised exactly that. Furthermore negotiations would have been more successful had there been a solicitor representing them. It is very often the case, that without guidance, a LIP will dig their heels in, when faced with correspondence from a solicitor there seems to be a tendency to either bury heads and ignore or push back harder. With the assistance of a solicitor, a difficult situation can be resolved much quicker as a solicitor will provide the much needed voice of reason.

Another issue that I witnessed was the amount of unnecessary applications made when one party was unrepresented. In the Children Act matter mentioned above the court went as far as making an order pursuant to S91(4) of the Children Act 1989. A S91(4) order is made in cases where there is a history of unreasonable and repeated applications. Where the above criteria is met, in the future should either party wish to make a further application, they would first have to make an application to the court seeking permission to do so. Only if permission is granted, would they be able to then make the substantive application. This type of order is used only as a last resort. In the aforementioned case, within the period of 4 years there had been 4 applications made in respect of the child arrangements.  This was clearly a case where a S91(4) was required. But again, I asked myself whether this would have been necessary had the unrepresented party had legal advice. I again encountered this issue during financial remedy proceedings, one party was unrepresented and two applications were made in the space of 8 weeks, the first application was so poorly made that the District Judge advised that although they wanted to make the order they simply couldn’t, the second application weeks later, although successful, was completely unnecessary, had the party in question obtained legal advice in the first instance, the initial application would have been successful without the need for a second hearing! These applications resulted in additional stress and costs for our client.

What has been evident through my involvement with cases where one party in unrepresented is that what is already an extremely difficult process becomes even more so. Increased costs for the represented party, unsuccessful negotiations, lengthy and sometimes unnecessary hearings and more heartache for all those involved, it surely cannot be said that the only victim is the LIP in these cases?

Photo by Alwyn Ladell via Flickr

Financial Orders: A Trainee Solicitor’s Primer

stowe family law leedsIt was somewhat eerie walking through town today on my way to the Stowe Family Law office in Leeds. The usual packed streets of the city centre resembled a ghost town! It is Christmas Eve however, and I am very much looking forward to spending tomorrow with my loved ones. The streets are empty, but my desk is not! I have many tasks to complete before I leave Stowe Family Law LLP for the Christmas break!

My day is starting with an Attendance Note from a conference I took note in last week. The conference was very informative and I must now compile the all of the relevant information into a document, which can be reviewed on a later date.

Much of my note is focused on the Financial Orders made available upon divorce. Once a marriage has irretrievably broken down, and consent to divorce is given by both parties, the most contentious issue is how they can achieve a financial settlement. This can be a quarrelsome issue as if one party feels as though they have been wronged they sometimes take the view that it entitles them to a substantially bigger share of the matrimonial assets. This is just one of the many reasons ancillary relief proceedings can be extremely difficult however. The Courts (unfortunately for the wrong party) do not deal with the emotional fall outs within the relationship; instead they deal solely with the finances, using factors listed in s25 of the Matrimonial Causes Act to guide them on the appropriate Order to be made.  I think it necessary that I now tell you what Orders are available!

The Court has the power to make the following Orders with regard to the finances:

  • Interim maintenance;
  • Long-term maintenance;
  • Lump sum payment;
  • Transfer of property; and
  • Pension sharing Orders
  • Child maintenance if the CSA do not have jurisdiction

The orders are not mutually exclusive, and the court can make the whole range of orders in any one case. The starting point for the division of the matrimonial assets is 50/50 but, in some cases, the Court will consider whether there should be a departure from equality taking into account factors listed under Section 25 of the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973. These include:


  1. The income, earning capacity, property and other financial resources which each of the parties to the marriage has or is likely to have in the foreseeable future, including in the case of earning capacity any increase in that capacity which it would in the opinion of the Court be reasonable to expect a party to the marriage to take steps to acquire;
  2. The financial needs, obligations and responsibilities which each of the parties to the marriage has or is likely to have in the foreseeable future;
  3. The standard of living enjoyed by the family before the breakdown of the marriage;
  4. The age of each party to the marriage and the duration of the marriage;
  5. The contributions which each of the parties has made or is likely in the foreseeable future to make to welfare of the family, including any contribution by looking after home or caring for the family;
  6. The conduct of each of the parties, if that conduct is such that it would be in the opinion of the Court be inequitable to disregard it;
  7. In the case of proceedings for divorce or nullity of marriage the value to each of the parties to the marriage of any benefit which, by reason of the dissolution or annulment of the marriage, that party will lose the chance of acquiring

Each case is thus heard of a case-by-case basis. The facts with regard to finances are different in every case, and thus different Orders are appropriate for each case. The Court’s primary aim is to provide a fair settlement, one which ultimately caters for both parties’ needs.

I am now going to get on with my work… otherwise I fear Santa may be leaving coal for me this year.

Merry Christmas to all, from the trainee solicitors and paralegals at Stowe Family Law!

Are you happier if you divorce?

secret to marriageIt is officially two days until Christmas, and I have jetted off home, back to bonnie wee Scotland for the festivities. But before I went, at Stowe Family Law LLP there was work still to be done.

On Friday I became best friends with Excel. No, seriously: we have formed some sort of bond. I am now a pro at making asset schedules and budget summaries.

An asset schedule is essentially a breakdown of all the relevant assets that the couple has, such as property, money in the bank and other miscellaneous assets such as cars, life polices, jewellery et al.

All these assets must be entered into the spreadsheet to give a grand total of the all assets owned by the husband, the wife and joint property assets. Then liabilities must be entered and deducted from the total assets. In addition to this, income has to be inserted into the schedule. Ta da! Now you have an asset schedule, which will become part of the client’s file for court proceedings.

I have also been thinking about Zoe’s recent blog post about marriage. Zoe has written about research showing that married couples live longer and are happier and healthier. This all seems to come to light at this time of year, when cynically it has been said that many couples seem to divorce after the Christmas period. And this is where I come in. I recently wrote a thesis on reforms in divorce law and discovered, like Zoe, that the breakdown of marriage can lead to a rise of social problems such as crime, substance abuse and, for children, declining academic performance. This would then suggest that in fact those who are married are happier and healthier.

However, I would like to provide a different take on this. What about if those couples who divorce are actually happier? There are positive perceptions associated with divorce: adults find fulfilment and children are able to develop successfully, surrounded by dynamic family forms. Divorce, arguably, can be viewed as a “second chance for happiness.” (Paul Amato).  Essentially, people who are healthier and happier in a marriage, have to have a happy marriage. But there are arguably couples in a marital relationship who are not happy and divorce can provide the happiness they need.

This should not be taken to mean that divorce is a simple, carefree process. It is evidently stressful and traumatic. However people do recover and sometimes become happier down the road.  My thesis explored the different coping mechanisms of divorcees and how psychologically people do recover and are able to reconstruct their lives and build on the “self.”

In other words: people can be happy in marriages, but divorce can also provide individuals with happiness. Then again, this conclusion is based on statistics, and we all know what people say about them…

Anyway, I am off and back home for the holidays. I look forward to returning to the Stowe Family Law LLP – Diary of a Trainee blog in the New Year.

Image credit: Lel4nd.